Grants

Broadband Grant Overviews

Last Mile

The Last Mile Grant program is established for assistance with capital expenses related to last mile broadband deployment in selected counties in areas that are currently lacking broadband at speeds of 100Mbps download and 20Mbps upload. Internet Service Providers are invited to apply for this program. A total of $60 million is allocated for this competitive grant program. Grants cover 70% of eligible project expenses with a required 30% match. Application window is from March 6 - April 10, 2024.

Training Opportunities for the Public (TOP)

The Training Opportunities for the Public (TOP) grant is available for public libraries to provide services to their communities relating to digital adoption and access. This grant is funded by TNECD and administered by the Tennessee State Library and Archives. Click here to read more about TOP grants.

Broadband Ready Communities (BRC)

As part of the Tennessee Broadband Accessibility Act of 2017, the State of Tennessee established the Broadband Ready Communities Program to foster county engagement in securing broadband infrastructure and access to their communities. Through TNECD, the program, which is funded by the American Rescue Plan State and Local Fiscal Recovery Funds, utilizes a portion of the Tennessee Emergency Broadband Fund – American Rescue Plan to provide $10 million in assistance. A non-competitive grant opportunity is available for county and local governments to secure up to $100,000 dollars for broadband adoption activities. Application window is from October 2 - December 12, 2023.

 

Digital Skills, Education, and Workforce Development (DSEW)

The Digital Skills, Education, and Workforce Development Grants Program (DSEW) will distribute $27 million across digital skills, education, and workforce development. Eligible applicants include A local educational agency (e.g., community college, vocational school)​, A community-based organization or faith-based organization​, A volunteer literacy organization, An institution of higher education​, A public or private nonprofit agency​, A library, A public housing authority, A nonprofit institution (that does not fit the above), A small business (1-10 employees)​, A consortium or coalition of the agencies, organizations, institutions, libraries, or entity described above​, A partnership between an employer and an entity above​. A maximum award of $1 million is available for this competitive grant opportunity. Grants cover 90% of eligible project expenses with a required 10% match. Application window is from October 16 - December 12, 2023.

Connected Community Facilities (CCF)

The Connected Community Facilities (CCF) Grant Program aims to construct and improve digital access through the creation of buildings or rehabilitation of existing facilities. The goal of this program is to enable digital workforce development, virtual health monitoring, virtual education, and broadband access -- all within one building for the community. Units of local government such as counties, municipalities, and entities like schools and libraries as well as organizations applying in partnerships with local governments are invited to apply for this competitive grant. A total of $30 million is available with a maximum award amount of $2 million. Grants cover 90% of eligible project expenses with a required 10% match.Application window is from October 2 - December 12, 2023.

SmartSimple

All TNECD grant applications are hosted on the SmartSimple platform. Please watch the demonstration video below to learn more about using the platform. Click here to access SmartSimple. 

Overview

Last Mile Grant Program

The Last Mile Grant program is established for assistance with capital expenses related to last mile broadband deployment in Polk, Hardin, and Wayne counties. The Last Mile Grant opportunity is funded by the Capital Projects Fund (CPF) of the American Rescue Plan (ARPA). The goal of this program is to facilitate high-speed broadband access, increase deployment, and encourage adoption of broadband in areas of Tennessee that are currently lacking broadband at speeds of 100 megabites per second (Mbps) download and 20 Mbps upload.

Tennessee HB1211

Tennessee HB1211 is a house bill that went into effect April 28, 2023, and amends Tennessee Code Annotated, Title 4, Chapter 3; Title 7; and Titles 65 and 67, relative to broadband services. The following is a general summary of the bill and its relevance to the Middle Mile Grant Opportunity.

This bill increases minimum download speeds from 10 Mbps to 100 Mbps and increases minimum upload speeds from 1 Mbps to 20 Mbps. Along with increases in these minimums, the bill also made amendments to the requirements for projects relevant to broadband; a general description of these amendments is as follows:

  • Priority will be given to projects that provide broadband service to the greatest number of locations (vs the largest area) at the highest speeds for the lowest grant amount per location.
  • Projects are not to be disqualified if the funds are used to alleviate costs of the installation of broadband facilities underground, but this bill prohibits the department from awarding a grant to locations that are being served by at least one provider offering minimum download and upload speeds (100/20 Mbps); or a federal or state grant has been allocated to a service provider to provide broadband services to the location at the minimum download and upload speeds.
    • Projects must have the ability to commit to dedicated at least 30% of the cost to deploy broadband.
    • For grants that are competing to provide service to the same location, preference must be given to applicants with a greater capital contribution.
    • All grantees must offer last mile services and be authorized to provide last mile services in the state of Tennessee.
    • If a broadband grant recipient does not complete the grant obligations, the recipient is liable for repayment of the entire grant in full, plus 30% of the grant amount.

 
Award Information

Last Mile Grant Program

A total of $20 million is allocated for the Last Mile Program. Where applications are divided into multiple application areas, the maximum grant request for the county will be divided equally across grant application areas. The grant will cover 70% of eligible project expenses, with a required 30% match by the grantee. All contracts with grantees must be in effect by December 31, 2024, and funds must be expended by December 31, 2026.

 

TNECD Contact Information

Donovan Spann | Broadband Infrastructure Coordinator

Tennessee Economic and Community Development

Tennessee Tower, 27 Floor

312 Rosa L. Parks Ave., Nashville, TN 37243 

donovan.spann@tn.gov

615-308-2965

 

Taylre M. Beaty | State Broadband Director

Tennessee Economic and Community Development

Tennessee Tower, 27 Floor

312 Rosa L. Parks Ave., Nashville, TN 37243

taylre.beaty@tn.gov

 

Emily Hale | Broadband Grants and Program Manager

Tennessee Economic and Community Development

Tennessee Tower, 27th Floor

312 Rosa L. Parks Ave, Nashville, TN, 37243

emily.hale@tn.gov

615-906-1057

Last Mile / Middle Mile Application Guidebook

Guidebook

 

FAQs

FAQ document

 

Last Mile / Middle Mile Application Webinar Materials

Presentation Slides

Webinar Video

 

Challenge Process Materials

Presentation Slides

Webinar Video

Last Mile Technical Scoring

Category

Scoring Criteria

Possible Points Per Category

Technical Need

Is the applicant eligible? Please consider eligibility guidelines in addition to FCC registration status.

Up to 50 possible points

Rate the level of need and difficulty of serving the area. When assessing the description of need, please consider why the area is difficult to serve and the likelihood the area would be served without grant funding.

Has this area received federal funding for broadband infrastructure? Note: Locations that have received federal funding or state funding are not eligible for this program and will not qualify for awards.

What is the percentage of locations in the grant area lacking 25/3 connection?

What is the percentage of locations in the grant area lacking 100/20 connection?

Leveraged and Match Funds

Additional matching funds – any funds provided by the applicant that exceed the required match

Up to 10 possible points

Sustainability and Implementation Readiness

Please rate the ability of the applicant to implement the project on time and within budget. Consider managerial, technical, and financial capabilities of the organization; prior experience with broadband or ability to bring on qualified experts; and long-term stability to manage the network moving forward.

Up to 30 possible points

Please rate the reasonableness of the applicant’s business model, project scope, budget, and timeline. Consider if this is a feasible project scope and timeline.

Speed, Scalability, and Affordability

Please rate the proposed speed’s ability to meet community needs.

Up to 28 possible points

Rate the scalability of the project

Compare the pricing levels to current market rates in rural Tennessee (tier closest to 100/20).

Please rate the proposed installation costs and/or equipment rental costs to the consumer.

Total Possible Points

 

Up to 118 total possible points

Last Mile Impact Scoring

Category

Scoring Criteria

Possible Points Per Category

Economic and Community Impact

Will the applicant provide service to a community anchor institution (CAI)?

Up to 30 possible points

Economic development impact: Consider and describe how the completion of the proposed project will lead to job creation, improve healthcare delivery, serve an economically distressed area, and/or impact educational access.

Is the project tailored to meet a need specific to that community? Look for evidence that the provider worked with the community in designing the project.

Community Support and Adoption Strategy

Partnerships and support from community organizations: Consider the quality and quantity of partnerships and community support. The partnerships can address adoption or access.

Up to 40 Possible Points

Assess the quality of the adoption plan. Consider the ability of the plan to address key drivers of adoption (e.g., relevance, skills, affordability, perception).

Has the applicant provided their own resources for adoption efforts? Consider whether the applicant is putting their own resources (beyond marketing) toward adoption (e.g., providing digital literacy, promoting low-income assistance, free/low-cost devices).

Does the applicant participate in the Affordable Connectivity Program (ACP) or offer their own low-cost service plan?

Total Possible Points

 

Up to 70 total possible points

Please see the DSEW guidebook  for complete program information

Program Description

Overview of the Grant Program

The Digital Skills, Education, and Workforce Development (DSEW) grants program, funded by the American Rescue Plan (ARPA), will distribute $17 million across digital skills, education, and workforce development, including broadband infrastructure workforce development and higher education/adult educational entities.

The digital skills and education program will invest in evidence-based initiatives that focus on improving introductory-level and advanced digital skills. The goal of this program is to support skilling programs and access to advanced digital tools so that individuals can develop the technical proficiency required to navigate complex digital environments, participate in the digital economy, and drive innovation.

The workforce development program will also invest in evidence-based initiatives that train broadband infrastructure professionals or digitally enabled professionals. The goal of the broadband infrastructures professionals is to develop a well-trained and diverse telecommunications workforce needed to deploy, manage, and maintain broadband infrastructure. The goal of the digitally-enabled professionals is to support digital upskilling across a wide variety of industries, including-but not limited to-technology, music and entertainment, finance, real estate, health care, education, and hospitality.

Federal Award Information

Funding Availability

TNECD will make up to $17 million available for federal assistance under the DSEW Grant Program.

Award Amount

The maximum allowable grant is $1 million. At least $5 million of the $17 million available funding will be allocated to adult educational entities or higher education institutions. This process will be competitive. The grant will cover up to 90%of eligible project expenses, with a required 10% hard match (cash) by the grantee. In-kind contributions (e.g., services provided by partnering community anchor institutions, donated office or meeting space) will not be considered.

Application limits

There is no limit to the number of submissions per applicant; however, no more than two grants will be awarded per applicant. Each application can reflect only 1 program.

Period of Performance

All contracts with grantees must be in effect by June 30, 2024, and funds must be expended by December 31, 2026.

 

Eligibility Requirements

Target Population

Please see the DSEW Guidebook for full information regarding Target Populations

Per ARPA SLFRF specifications, the populations served directly by the grantee in counties with an AMI above $65,880 must fall into one of the following categories:

  • Households at or below 300% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines for a default household size of 3 ($65,880)
  • Households that experienced unemployment or increased food or housing insecurity
  • Households that qualify for the Children's Health Insurance Program, Childcare Subsidies through the Child Care Development Fund (CCDF) Program, or Medicaid
  • Households residing in a Qualified Census Tracts: Census Tracts, blocks, or zip codes that meet the designation of "impacted"/"disproportionately impacted" designation or are considered Qualified Census Tracts

If one of these categories do not apply to the project, the applicant will be responsible for verifying that the individual end users of the proposed project satisfy the state and federal guidance through eligibility verification.

For more information, please reference the ARPA SLFRF Final Rule (pages 12, 17 to 20) or the 2023 Interim Final Rule (pages 164 to 165).

Eligible Program Activities and Services

TNECD will examine the educational design of the program activities and services proposed to determine whether participants can exit the programs with the market­ relevant skills, experience, abilities, and qualifications necessary to further their personal and professional goals in digital environments. For workforce development purposes, an effective educational design would promote learning within the context of the work and the community, provide professional development of the individual with top-down support, and nurture each learner's agency.

Please note that proposed workforce development programs must offer job placements or other services that prevent the underemployment of program participants.

Eligible Educational Activities

  • Adult education
  • Intermediate and/or specialized digital skills training in K-12 schools
  • Workplace education, which refers to adult education and literacy activities offered by an eligible provider; collaboration with an employer or employee organization at a workplace or an off-site location is required.
  • Micro-learning
  • Apprenticeship program
  • Industry-relevant credentialing programs
  • Digital navigators
  • Other educational activities
  • Providing training to trainers/educators on eligible activities

Ineligible Programs

  • Conducting of training and apprenticeship programs by internet service providers (ISPs)
  • Conducting adoption promotion activities (e.g., adoption campaign, low-cost plans, digital inclusion initiatives)
  • Programs that conduct awareness and outreach campaigns and activities of digital inclusion programming and resources, such as the Affordable Connectivity Program (ACP), but do not provide accompanying skilling services (e.g., marketing and awareness campaigns where skilling services are not provided)
  • Digital opportunity coalitions/taskforces
  • K-12 school system one-to-one computer programs
  • Direct technical troubleshooting or repair services for broken devices

List of Eligible Digital Skills and Broadband Occupations


This section provides examples of the eligible digital skills or broadband infrastructure roles that can be awarded funding under the DSEW program.

Basic/Introductory Digital Skills

  • Basic professional/educational skills: Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, PowerPoint)
  • Communication technologies (e.g., Zoom, WebEx, email), data entry
  • Navigation of the internet for well-being purposes: accessing government services (e.g., social services website), telehealth literacy (e.g., searching for doctors, scheduling appointments)
  • Foundational knowledge about the internet and related technologies (e.g., internet, wi-fi, router)
  • Distance/remote education
  • Telework
  • Social media
  • Internet safety (e.g., foundational cybersecurity, personal information protection, parent/child protection, network safety and privacy, protection and awareness (e.g., phishing), online scam/fraud prevention, virtual private network (VPN), virtual desktop)
  • Any other training that is designed to eliminate barriers to foundational adoption of digital skills

Advanced/Specialized Digital Skills

  • Coding courses
  • Programming, website, and application development
  • Software development and implementation
  • Information technology skills
  • Marketing and content creation
  • Data science
  • Data management (e.g., Excel data tracking)
  • Data visualization
  • User experience design
  • Digital business analysis
  • Computer programming
  • Digital business management
  • Use of precision technology
  • Application development
  • Digital media and marketing
  • Generative Al
  • Cybersecurity
  • Digital entertainment-related skills (e.g., music, design, social media, digital marketing, product distribution, search engine optimization, data analytics, facility management, sales management systems)
  • Financial literacy and knowledge about "financial freedom" (e.g., online investment courses, how to use credit cards, retirement planning)
  • Advanced manufacturing skills (e.g., robotics)
  • Health data analytics
  • Real estate (e.g., rental and lease, property ownership and management, taxes)
  • Management (e.g., human resources management systems)
  • Industrial sector (e.g., robotics, augmented reality, hand-held devices supporting applications)
  • Any other training that is identified to meet digitally focused workforce development needs

Broadband Infrastructure Occupations (Tentative)

  • Construction laborers
  • Fiber splicing
  • Electrical power-line installers and repairers
  • Electrical, electronic, and electromechanical assemblers
  • Electricians first-line supervisors of construction
  • Miscellaneous assemblers and fabricators
  • Network planner
  • Network designer
  • Project manager
  • Estimator
  • Land surveyor
  • Pole surveyor
  • OSP engineer
  • Permitting officer
  • Procurement lead
  • Laborer
  • Pole/anchor foreman
  • Tower/antenna foreman
  • Safety lead
  • Locator
  • Quality inspector
  • Field engineer
  • Tower Technician
  • Wireless technician
  • Tower climbers
  • Fiber optic technician
  • Splicer technician
  • Fiber lineman
  • Fiber technician
  • Antennae installers
  • Electrician
  • Premise installation technician

Applicant Qualification

Eligible Grant Applicants

  • A local educational agency (e.g., community college, such as a vocational school)
  • A community-based or faith-based organization
  • A volunteer literacy organization
  • An institution of higher education
  • A public or private nonprofit agency
  • A library
  • A public housing authority
  • A nonprofit institution (that does not fit the above)
  • A small business (1-10 employees)
  • A consortium or coalition of the agencies, organizations, institutions, libraries, or entity described above
  • A partnership between an employer and an entity above

Ineligible Grant Applicants

  • Internet service providers
  • Government entities (e.g., local government, corrections departments, commissions)
  • "Pass-through" entities, or entities seeking to receive TNECD grant funding to distribute to other organizations through their own grant programs

Match Requirements

The grant will cover up to 90% of eligible project expenses, with a required 10% match by the Grantee.

Financial Capability

Applicants must provide proof of the project's financing documentation, including their ability to fund the match as well as the grant funds (prior to reimbursement). Two of the following documents must be provided and show that the project can cover the match requirement and any additional funding needed for expenses prior to reimbursement:

  • Audited financials
  • Bank statement
  • Letter of credit
  • Proof of funds

Use of Project Funds: Allowable vs. Unallowable Costs

All applications for DSEW must have a detailed budget narrative explaining and justifying the expenditures by budget category.


For each cost listed below, the applicant must provide the breakdown of each cost. Additionally, applicants must provide a description of each charge to include what it is, who will be doing it (if applicable and if known), and how it relates to the project objectives. If the applicant will be using a match within a cost category, this must be noted and explained in the justification to include a breakdown of the federal and non-federal share of each proposed cost.

The following categories are the most common for grantees and are allowable costs to the grant. Applicants are invited to suggest additional costs relevant to each of these categories with a justification. However, TNECD reserves the right to reject proposed costs that are not applicable to the grant.

Allowable Costs

  • Salaries and Wages
  • Employee Benefits and Payroll Taxes
  • Professional Fees related to providing services
  • Supplies related to training
  • Capital purchases related to training equipment
  • Specific assistance to individuals
    • Public transportation vouchers, child care, etc..    
  • Other non-personnel expenses (digital subscriptions, software licenses)
  • Administrative expenses pertaining to the oversight of the grant (indirect expenses; limited to 6% or indirect cost rate if negotiated indirect cost rate agreement is in place)

Unallowable Costs

  • Travel costs (associated with program-related functions)
    • Flights/airfare
    • Hotels/lodging
    • Meals
    • Transportation (vehicle rentals, etc.)
    • Related insurance
  • Discounted internet service
  • Incentives for incorporation of broadband across different sectors
    • Subsidies
    • Tax benefits
  • Promotional items and memorabilia
    • Models
    • Gifts
    • Souvenirs
    • Other costs designed solely to promote the grant-holding agency
  • Entertainment
    • Food
    • Amusement
    • Diversion
    • Social activities
    • Other associated costs
  • Grants and awards
    • Scholarships or vouchers to fund industry-relevant credentialing
  • Capital purchases
    • Vehicle
    • Land acquisition
  • Costs that are not reasonable, necessary, or allocable to the grant

 

Compliance

Fair Labor Practices

Applicants must provide record of and plans to be in compliance with federal labor and employment laws. The following is a general summary of laws that applicants must comply with; this summary is not exhaustive. For the exhaustive list of federal labor and employment laws, reference State and Local Fiscal Recovery Funds Guidance lune 2023 (treasury.gov).

  • Davis-Bacon Act (Subchapter IV of Chap. 31 of Title 40, United States Code):
    • Applicants must provide certification that all laborers employed to be working on the project are paid wages at rates not less than those prevailing.
    • If certification is not provided, then the applicant must provide a project employment and local impact report that includes the following:

i.  The number of contractors and sub-contractors working on the project

ii.  The number of employees on the project hired directly and hired through a third party

iii.  The wages and benefits of workers on the project by classification

iv.  Whether those wages are at rates less than those prevailing

  • National Labor Relations Act (29 U.S.C. 158(f)):
    • Recipients are to provide certification that the project includes a project labor agreement, a pre-hire collective bargaining agreement that is in accordance with the National Labor Relations Act (29 U.S.C. 158(f)) section 8(f).
  • Applicants must provide information on whether the project prioritizes local hires.
  • Applicants must provide information on whether the project has a Community Benefit Agreement with a description of such agreement.

Civil Rights and Nondiscrimination Law

Recipients of the Broadband Ready Communities Program are required to be in compliance with all civil rights and nondiscrimination federal laws related to the use of federal funds. Recipients shall not discriminate or deny benefits or services, on the basis of race, color, national origin (including limited English proficiency), disability, age, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, or handicap. Recipients are required to agree to, by a form of binding commitment, abide by all civil rights and non-discrimination requirements set forth. The following is a general description of requirements; for an exhaustive list with exact requirements, reference State and Local Fiscal Recovery Funds Guidance lune 2023 (treasury.gov).

  1. Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. § 2000d-1 et seq.) and the Treasury's implementing regulations, 31 C.F.R. part 22, which states that no person in the United States shall, on the basis of race, color, or national origin, excluded from      participation in, denied benefits or services of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance.
  2. Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (20 U.S.C § 1681 et seq.) and the Treasury's implementing regulations, 31 C.F.R. part 28, states that no person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, denied benefits or services of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance.
  3. The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C § 12101 et seq.) states that discrimination on the basis of disability in employment, state and local government, public accommodations, commercial facilities, transportation, and telecommunications is strictly prohibited.
  4. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. § 794) prohibits the discrimination of a qualified individual with a disability under any program or activity that receives federal financial assistance.
  5. The Age Discrimination Act of 1975 (42 U.S.C. § 6101 et seq.), and the Treasury's implementing regulations, 31 C.F.R. part 23, prohibits discrimination based on age for any programs or activities receiving federal financial assistance.
  6. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 42 U.S.C. § 2000e et seq., states that it is an unlawful employment practice for an employer to discriminate against an individual with respect to employment on the basis of the individual's race, color, religion, sex, or national origin.

Domestic Preference

Under Uniform Guidance (2 CFR 200.322), grantees must provide a preference for the purchase, acquisition, or use of goods, products, or materials produced in the United States. This includes items and construction materials composed of metals, plastics, aggregate (such as optical fiber), and lumber. All items made in whole or in part of these covered materials apply. Grantees should make all efforts to document this preference and ensure subcontractor compliance, including listing the referenced clause in all subcontracts.

 

Application Guide

DSEW Application Guide

 

Webinar Materials

DSEW Webinar Slides

DSEW Webinar Video

 

Program FAQs

DSEW FAQs

Please see the CCF guidebook for complete program information

UPDATE - the application window for the CCF grant has been extended to December 12, 2023

Program Description

Overview of the Grant Program

The Connected Community Facilities (CCF) Grant Program aims to construct and improve digital access through the creation of buildings or rehabbing spaces. The goal of this program, which is funded by the Capital Project Fund (CPF) and the American Rescue Plan (ARPA) State Local Fiscal Recovery Funds (SLFRF), is to allow for digital workforce development, virtual health monitoring, and virtual education within one space. It will allow rural and urban communities to build new community facilities or rehabilitate existing ones to provide these services and broadband access within one building.

Useful Term

  • Community Anchor Institution (CAI): An entity, such as a school, library, health clinic, health center, hospital or other medical provider, public safety entity, institution of higher education, public housing organization, and eligible faith­ based institutions. Community support organizations that facilitate greater use of broadband service by vulnerable populations, including (but not limited to) low-income individuals, unemployed individuals, children, the incarcerated, and aged individuals, are also considered CAls for CCF.
    • Grantees should partner with a CAI, unless the applicant itself is a CAI, to demonstrate their understanding of the needs of the communities in which they are building their projects and in helping to design and deliver digital adoption services

Federal Award Information

Funding Availability

TNECD will make up to $30 million available for federal assistance under the Connected Communities Facilities Grant Program.

Award Amount

The maximum grant request allowable for the Connected Community Facilities Grant Program is $2 million.

Period of Performance

All contracts with grantees must be in effect by June 30, 2024. Funds must be expended within two years of contract signing.

 

Eligibility Requirements

Applicant Qualifications

Applicants should demonstrate a need for funding assistance to serve the project area, quality partnerships, and support from community organization.  

Eligible Grant Applicants

The following types of entities may apply for the grant

  • Units of local governments in the State of Tennessee, such as counties and municipalities, including government entities like public libraries
  • Organizations, such as community anchor institutions, applying in partnership with the local government

Eligible Communities

Per CPF and SLFRF guidelines, an automatically eligible county is a county with a Median Family Income at or below 300% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines for a default household size of 3 ($65,880). Also, in order to align with Gov. Bill Lee's Executive Order 1, applicants may use funding to provide service to communities deemed eligible by TNECD; these eligible communities are within counties that are considered "at risk" or "distressed" within Tennessee. Counties are determined to be either "at risk" or "distressed" by the measurements of the county's three-year average unemployment rate, per capita market income, and poverty rate (defined by the Appalachian Regional Commission).

Please note that counties with AMIs above $65,880 are still eligible to apply if they show the project serves at least one of the target populations listed below.

  • Households or populations at or below $65,880 in annual income (300% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines for a default household size of 3, per 2022 US Treasury-provided estimates) OR
  • Households that experienced unemployment or increased food or housing insecurity OR
  • Households that qualify for these programs: Children’s Health Insurance Program, Childcare Subsidies through the Child Care Development Fund (CCDF) Program, or Medicaid OR
  • Households or populations residing in Qualified Census Tracts

If these categories do not apply to the project, the applicant will be responsible for verifying that the individual end users of the proposed project satisfy the state and federal guidance through eligibility verification. For more information, please reference the ARPA SLFRF Final Rule (pages 12, 17 to 20), the 2023 Interim Final Rule (pages 42 to 43), and Revised CPF State Guidance June 2023 (treasury.gov).

A list of counties considered “automatically eligible communities” and counties that will be required to additionally state and verify the target populations they are serving will be posted on TNECD’s website.

At-Risk/Distressed Communities

Following Governor Bill Lee’s Executive Order 1, applicants from an "at-risk" or "distressed" county, as designated by the Appalachian Regional Commission, will receive 5 additional points in their scoring. In fiscal year 2024, Tennessee's "at-risk" and "distressed" counties were:

  • At-Risk (27): Benton, Campbell, Carroll, Carter, Claiborne, Decatur, Fentress, Greene, Grundy, Hawkins, Haywood, Houston, Jackson, Johnson, Lauderdale, Lewis, Macon, McNairy, Meigs, Morgan, Pickett, Rhea, Sequatchie, Unicoi, Van Buren, Warren, Wayne
  • Distressed (8): Bledsoe, Clay, Cocke, Hancock, Hardeman, Perry, Scott, Lake

Target Populations

Please see the CCF Program Guidebook for complete information about Target Populations

Per ARPA CPF and SLFRF specifications, the population(s) served directly by the grantee in a county with an AMI above $65,880 must fall into one of the following 4 categories:

  • Households at or below 300% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines for a default household size of 3 ($65,880)
  • Households that experienced unemployment or increased food or housing insecurity
  • Households that qualify for the Children’s Health Insurance Program, Childcare Subsidies through the Child Care Development Fund (CCDF) Program, or Medicaid
  • Providing Services in a Qualified Census Tracts: Census Tracts, blocks, or zip codes that meet the designation of “impacted”/“disproportionately impacted” designation or are considered Qualified Census Tracts

If these categories do not apply to the project, the applicant will be responsible for verifying that the individual end users of the proposed project satisfy the state and federal guidance through eligibility verification. For more information, please reference the ARPA SLFRF Final Rule (pages 12, 17 to 20), the 2023 Interim Final Rule (pages 42 to 43), and Revised CPF State Guidance June 2023 (treasury.gov).[MS1] [OI2]

Digital Adoption and Outreach Priorities

Applications must outline efforts to promote digital adoption, and they will be required to describe those efforts in a series of application questions. Applicants must explain how they plan to enable digital adoption for their communities in the areas of digital education, digital workforce development, digital healthcare monitoring, and broadband access by providing resources and services at the proposed facility. The applicant is required to address the role and involvement of the community in the project by discussing the number of people it will serve (including how the number was calculated), how the applicant will measure the impact of the facility on the community, any priority populations (COVID impacted and/or disproportionally impacted) that the facility's services are directed towards, and partnerships with community partners (if any).

The applicant will also be required to describe their project implementation plan, including a timeline of activities for the preparation of the facility for opening and activities towards for the delivery of services to the community. Additionally, the applicant must explain how they plan to conduct widespread outreach so that communities are aware of the facility and have the information necessary to fully use the resources, services, and/or programming offered.

Funds Matching and State Coordination

The grant will cover up to 80% of eligible project expenses, with a required 20% match by the grantee.

Applicants who are not a local government unit themselves or are not already in connection with a local government unit must apply in partnership with one. These applicants include but are not limited to non-profit organizations. These partnerships can also provide insight into affordability to ensure that project costs, facility sites, and access costs are feasible for the community.

Financial Capability

Applicants must provide proof of the project's financing documentation, including their ability to fund the match as well as the grant funds (prior to reimbursement). Two of the following documents must be provided and show that the project can cover the match requirement and any additional funding needed for expenses prior to reimbursement:

  • Audited financials
  • Bank statement
  • Letter of credit
  • Proof of funds

Additional Match

Providing additional match funding beyond the required 20% will not result in a higher score. 

If a recipient has an additional match, they will receive a lower percentage of reimbursement per invoice. Because the additional match increases the total funding of the project, the percentage of reimbursement per invoice will be lower. The 80% match will be applied to the original project funding amount only.

Community Anchor Institutions (CAIs)

Grantees should partner with a CAI, unless the applicant itself is a CAI, to demonstate their understanding of the needs of the communities in which they are building thier projects and to encourage digital adoption.

Use of Project Funds

Eligible Uses

Grant funding can only be used to pay for necessary construction, acquisition, and improvement of such facilities. Costs that appear excessive and/or without justification and costs not considered eligible will not be reimbursed. The following are eligible costs:

  • Costs of construction, repair, rehabilitation, installation, improvement, and acquisition of real property, equipment (e.g., devices and office equipment), and facilities (e.g., telecommunications equipment)
    • In the event of office equipment items or otherwise non-structure related items, an inventory management system must be in place for tracking of grant funded items.
  • Engineering, architectural, and project management costs including mileage rates involved in designing and constructing the proposed project
  • Pre-project development costs and uses, including data gathering, feasibility studies, community engagement and public feedback processes, equity assessments and planning, needs assessments, permitting, planning, architectural design, engineering design, and work related to environmental, historical, and cultural reviews
  • Cost of long-term leases (for terms greater than five years) of facilities required to provide qualifying broadband service, including indefeasible right-of-use (IRU) agreements and capital leases
    • In the event of a building under lease, if the applicant is not a local government entity, the owner of the property must be the local governmental entity in partnership with the applicant
  • Internal labor costs incurred as part of eligible project activities
    • Only reimbursable up to the proportion of employees' time spent exclusively on project activities during the period for which reimbursement is sought. When seeking reimbursement, applicants must submit such costs as line items and provide supporting documentation for the expense. Supporting documentation shall include time spent by each employee on project activities, total time spent by each employee during the period for which reimbursement is sought, and hourly cost. Indirect costs are not reimbursable.
      • Internal labor costs are not full reimbursements of payroll and salary, but hourly labor tracked for make-ready construction in the service area.
      • It is required that the grantee submit a report from the internal payroll system showing date/period during which the work was performed, hourly rates, and a description of the activities performed.
  • Capital purchase to include vehicles or equipment purchased at $5,000 or more
  • Ancillary costs necessary to operationalize and put the capital assets to full use, including costs to increase broadband adoption and improve digital literacy
  • Other miscellaneous upfront costs, with the written permission of TNECD: Includes any other upfront costs not covered in other categories, such as site preparation, permits, required licenses, shipping and warehousing expenses, and miscellaneous minor material
  • Stored materials (make-ready purchases): The stored materials should be documented in a spreadsheet that shows the material, price per unit, quantity used, total cost, and approximate date of use. No proof of payment is required
  • Tax: Tax payments are also reimbursed. There are two situations that must be addressed:
    • If the provider/contractor is charged sales tax and it shows on the vendor invoices, the expense can be reimbursed and should be supported by the relevant proofs of payment.
    • If the provider/contractor is charged tax on a lump sum basis and not on individual invoices, the tax payments can be reimbursed given the grantee details out the tax payment separately while claiming reimbursement.
  • Screenshots from grantee's accounting/management information system, as well as monthly tax returns, are acceptable documentation.
  • Cost principles identified in 2 CFR Part 200, Subpart E, if not identified otherwise herein

Ineligible Uses

Ineligible costs include any costs that are not for necessary construction, acquisition. and improvement of such facilities. Costs that appear excessive and/or without justification and costs not considered eligible will not be reimbursed.

  • Operational and reoccurring expenses, other than grant administration costs
  • Fundraising activities
  • Short-term operating leases
  • Expenses incurred prior to the date of the grant award announcement (except for make-ready and inventory backdated to March 15, 2021)
  • Payment of interest or principal on outstanding debt instruments, or other debt service costs
  • Fees or issuance costs associated with the issuance of new debt
  • Satisfaction of any obligation arising under or pursuant to a settlement agreement, judgment, consent decree, or judicially confirmed debt restructuring plan in a judicial, administrative, or regulatory proceeding
  • Activities to support or oppose collective bargaining

 

Compliance

Fair Labor Practices

Applicants must provide record of and plans to be in compliance with federal labor and employment laws. The following is a general summary of laws that applicants must comply with; this summary is not exhaustive. For the exhaustive list of federal labor and employment laws, reference State and Local Fiscal Recovery Funds Guidance lune 2023 (treasury.gov).

  • Davis-Bacon Act (Subchapter IV of Chap. 31 of Title 40, United States Code):
    • Applicants must provide certification that all laborers employed to be working on the project are paid wages at rates not less than those prevailing.
    • If certification is not provided, then the applicant must provide a project employment and local impact report that includes the following:

i.  The number of contractors and sub-contractors working on the project

ii.  The number of employees on the project hired directly and hired through a third party

iii.  The wages and benefits of workers on the project by classification

iv.  Whether those wages are at rates less than those prevailing

  • National Labor Relations Act (29 U.S.C. 158(f)):
    • Recipients are to provide certification that the project includes a project labor agreement, a pre-hire collective bargaining agreement that is in accordance with the National Labor Relations Act (29 U.S.C. 158(f)) section 8(f).
  • Applicants must provide information on whether the project prioritizes local hires.
  • Applicants must provide information on whether the project has a Community Benefit Agreement with a description of such agreement.

Civil Rights and Nondiscrimination Law

Recipients of the Broadband Ready Communities Program are required to be in compliance with all civil rights and nondiscrimination federal laws related to the use of federal funds. Recipients shall not discriminate or deny benefits or services, on the basis of race, color, national origin (including limited English proficiency), disability, age, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, or handicap. Recipients are required to agree to, by a form of binding commitment, abide by all civil rights and non-discrimination requirements set forth. The following is a general description of requirements; for an exhaustive list with exact requirements, reference State and Local Fiscal Recovery Funds Guidance lune 2023 (treasury.gov).

  1. Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. § 2000d-1 et seq.) and the Treasury's implementing regulations, 31 C.F.R. part 22, which states that no person in the United States shall, on the basis of race, color, or national origin, excluded from      participation in, denied benefits or services of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance.
  2. Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (20 U.S.C § 1681 et seq.) and the Treasury's implementing regulations, 31 C.F.R. part 28, states that no person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, denied benefits or services of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance.
  3. The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C § 12101 et seq.) states that discrimination on the basis of disability in employment, state and local government, public accommodations, commercial facilities, transportation, and telecommunications is strictly prohibited.
  4. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. § 794) prohibits the discrimination of a qualified individual with a disability under any program or activity that receives federal financial assistance.
  5. The Age Discrimination Act of 1975 (42 U.S.C. § 6101 et seq.), and the Treasury's implementing regulations, 31 C.F.R. part 23, prohibits discrimination based on age for any programs or activities receiving federal financial assistance.
  6. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 42 U.S.C. § 2000e et seq., states that it is an unlawful employment practice for an employer to discriminate against an individual with respect to employment on the basis of the individual's race, color, religion, sex, or national origin.

Domestic Preference

Under Uniform Guidance (2 CFR 200.322), grantees must provide a preference for the purchase, acquisition, or use of goods, products, or materials produced in the United States. This includes items and construction materials composed of metals, plastics, aggregate (such as optical fiber), and lumber. All items made in whole or in part of these covered materials apply. Grantees should make all efforts to document this preference and ensure subcontractor compliance, including listing the referenced clause in all subcontracts.

 

Program Guidebook

Connected Community Facilities Guidebook

 

Webinar Materials

Webinar Slides

Webinar Video

 

Program FAQs

CCF FAQs

Click below to see if you community is Broadband Ready!

Please see the BRC guidebook for complete program information

UPDATE - the application window for the BRC grant has been extended to December 12, 2023

Overview of the Grant Program

Federal Award Information

As part of the Tennessee Broadband Accessibility Act of 2017 (TBAA), the State of Tennessee established the Broadband Ready Communities Program to foster county engagement in securing broadband infrastructure and access to their communities. “Broadband Ready Community” is a designation certified by the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development (TNECD) that counties acquire when they pass an ordinance acknowledging broadband infrastructure as an essential need and committing to reducing administrative barriers to broadband projects in their county. Since the start of the program, 65 counties and localities have been certified as Broadband Ready. Now expanded, the Broadband Ready Communities Program will utilize a portion of the Tennessee Emergency Broadband Fund – American Rescue Plan (TEBF-ARP) to promote community-based digital adoption work to ensure that constituents have the resources and digital skills necessary to access broadband infrastructure. The expanded program involves working with local officials and counties on closing the digital divide as the state prepares to receive the most significant investment in broadband infrastructure in state history.

Funding Availability

TNECD will make up to $10 million available for federal assistance under the Broadband Ready Communities Program. Important: This is a non-competitive grant opportunity; hence, submitted proposals will not undergo a competitive scoring process. There is no match requirement. TNECD and the Development Districts of Tennessee will review all applications and other relevant documents and records. Projects that meet the completeness review and are approved by the review team will be presented to TNECD’s Grant Committee, comprising the commissioner, deputy commissioners, assistant commissioners, and others designated by the commissioner that approves all TNECD grants.

Award Amount

The maximum grant request allowable under the Broadband Ready Communities Program is $100,000.

Period of Performance

All contracts with grantees must be in effect by June 30, 2024. Funds must be expended by December 31, 2026.

 

Eligibility Requirements

Target Populations

Per ARPA SLFRF specifications, the population(s) served by the grantee must fall into one of the following categories:

  • Households at or below 300% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines for a default household size of 3 ($65,880)
  • Households that experienced unemployment or increased food or housing insecurity
  • Households that qualify for the Children's Health Insurance Program, Childcare Subsidies through the Child Care Development Fund (CCDF) Program, or Medicaid
  • Providing Services in a Qualified Census Tracts: Census Tracts, blocks, or zip codes that meet the designation of "impacted"/"disproportionately impacted" designation or are considered Qualified Census Tracts
  • Providing Services in Eligible TN counties: The counties' Median Family Income is at or below 300% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines for a default household size of 3 ($65,880). A list of eligible Tennessee counties will be posted on TNECD's website.

If one of these categories do not apply to the project, the applicant will be responsible for verifying that the individual end users of the proposed project satisfy the state and federal guidance through eligibility verification. For more information, please reference the ARPA SLFRF Final Rule (pages 12, 17 to 20) or the 2023 Interim Final Rule (pages 164 to 165).

Eligible Applicants

The following are eligible to apply for a Broadband Ready Grant:

  • Any county that has a Broadband Ready designation.
  • Any county that does not have a Broadband Ready designation.
    • The county can submit the duly executed Broadband Ready ordinance or policy in the application; a sample of an acceptable ordinance is available on the TNECD Broadband Communities page.
  • A locality/other political subdivision with a Broadband Ready designation located in a county that does not have a Broadband Ready designation:
    • The locality may apply for funding on behalf of the county.
    • The locality must submit written proof that both the county government and local government agree to such arrangement.
      • Grant awards will be made to the county; it is the responsibility of the locality to coordinate with the county government throughout the application process.

Digital Adoption Priorities

Applicants must have efforts for promoting digital literacy in place, which they will be required to describe in a series of application questions. Examples of areas where counties may focus their digital literacy efforts are telehealth, workforce development, and education. The planned efforts should include at least three of the five elements of digital inclusion (as defined by the National Digital Inclusion Alliance [NOIA]), which are:

•     Affordable, robust broadband internet service

•     Internet-enabled devices that meet the needs of the user

•     Access to digital literacy training

•     Quality technical support

•     Applications or online content designed to enable and encourage self-sufficiency, participation, and collaboration

Required Use of a Development District Professional Grant Administrator

All awardees will be required to use a Development District Professional Grant Administrator across the grant cycle. The awardee (county) will receive an initial drawdown of $1,000 post completeness review and upon contract signing to pay to the Development District for application review. The remaining 5% - 6% will be paid out during the contract term to reimburse grant administrative activities performed by Development District staff through the Administrative expense contract category.

Eligible Program Activities

The grant request limit is $100,000. Applicants must provide detailed explanation of how the project budget was determined.

Eligible Activities

Grant funding for Broadband Ready Communities is intended to support activities and initiatives that promote digital adoption. The following are eligible activities that the funds may be used for:

Digital skills training

  • Grant funds may be utilized to design, develop, and implement digital skills training programs aimed at enhancing the digital literacy of residents. Examples of eligible costs are fees for curriculum development, instructor wages, curriculum supplies, software licenses, and facilities necessary for conducting training sessions. The program should support skilling programs and access to basic or advanced digital tools

Education and workforce development

  • Grant funds may be used to establish and enhance educational and workforce development initiatives including adult education, digital skills training in K-12 schools, workplace preparation and education, apprenticeships, and industry­ relevant credentialing or micro-learning programs.

Equipment/devices

  • Grant funding may be leveraged for procurement and distribution of necessary free or low-cost equipment and devices, such as computers and tablets, to further the goal of broadband readiness and bridge the digital divide.

Marketing and public outreach for the Affordable Connectivity Program (ACP)

Grant funds may be used for the creation and implementation of marketing campaigns to raise awareness about the ACP. These include expenses related to:

  • Developing promotional materials such as:
    • Printed communications (e.g., brochures, flyers, pamphlets)
    • Digital content (e.g., videos, animations, infographics)
    • Other traditional advertising methods (e.g., radio broadcasts)
  • Labor for grassroots door-to-door outreach

Public Wifi

Grantees can use no more than 50% of total funding to make public Wi-Fi available and accessible:

•     Costs of construction, repair, rehabilitation, installation, improvement, and acquisition of real property, equipment (e.g., devices and office equipment), and facilities (e.g., telecommunications equipment) for public Wi-Fi

•     Pre-project development costs and uses for public Wi-Fi, including data­ gathering, feasibility studies, public feedback processes, equity assessments and planning, needs assessments, permitting, planning, engineering design, and work related to environmental, historical,         and cultural review

•     Internal labor costs incurred as part of eligible project activities

•     Ancillary costs necessary to operationalize the capital assets and put them to full use

Other costs relating to broadband readiness

These include miscellaneous costs that align with the overall goal of the Broadband Ready Communities Program. Costs that appear excessive and/or without justification and costs not considered eligible will not be reimbursed.

Ineligible Activities

Grant funding for Broadband Ready Communities may not be used for these activities:

•     Payment of county wages to support implementation of grants

•     Any costs necessary for the construction of, acquisition of, or improvement of middle mile and last mile infrastructure in unserved areas (areas lacking minimum download and upload speeds of 25 Mbps and 3 Mbps, respectively) and underserved areas (those lacking        at least 100/20 Mbps)

•     Internal administrative activities

•     Fundraising activities

•     Satisfaction of any obligation arising under or pursuant to a settlement agreement judgment, consent decree, or judicially confirmed debt restructuring plan in a judicial, administrative, or regulatory proceeding

•     Activities to support or oppose collective bargaining

 

Use of Project Funds: Allowable vs. Unallowable Costs

Allowable Costs

Grant funding for Broadband Ready Communities may be used for these purposes:

•     Supplies, telephone, postage and shipping, equipment rental and maintenance, and printing

•     Capital purchases

•     Construction

•     Architect/engineering fees

•     Professional fees and grant and awards

•     Other non-personnel

•     Administrative expenses

•     Project Contingency

Unallowable Costs

Grant funding for Broadband Ready Communities may not be used for these purposes:

  • Travel costs (associated with program-related functions
    • Flights/airfare
    • Hotels/lodging
    • Meals
    • Vehicle rentals (however, mileage may be charged per the state-level regulations of $0.655/mile
    • Related insurance
  • Discounts or subsidized broadband service
  • Incentives for incorporation of broadband across different sectors
    • Subsidies
    • Tax benefits
  • Promotional items and memorabilia
    • Models
    • Gifts
    • Souvenirs
    • Other costs designed solely to promote the grant-holding agency
  • Entertainment
    • Food
    • Amusement
    • Diversion
    • Social activities
    • Other associated costs
  • Grants and awards
    • Scholarships or vouchers to fund industry-relevant credentialing
  • Capital purchases
    • Vehicles
    • Land acquisition
  • Fundraising activities
  • Expenses incurred prior to the date of the grant award announcement
  • Payment of interest or principal on outstanding debt instruments, or other debt service costs
  • Fees or issuance costs associated with the issuance of new debt
  • Costs that are not reasonable, necessary, or allocable to the grant

Compliance

Fair Labor Practices

Applicants must provide record of and plans to be in compliance with federal labor and employment laws. The following is a general summary of laws that applicants must comply with; this summary is not exhaustive. For the exhaustive list of federal labor and employment laws, reference State and Local Fiscal Recovery Funds Guidance lune 2023 (treasury.gov).

  • Davis-Bacon Act (Subchapter IV of Chap. 31 of Title 40, United States Code):
    • Applicants must provide certification that all laborers employed to be working on the project are paid wages at rates not less than those prevailing.
    • If certification is not provided, then the applicant must provide a project employment and local impact report that includes the following:

i.  The number of contractors and sub-contractors working on the project

ii.  The number of employees on the project hired directly and hired through a third party

iii.  The wages and benefits of workers on the project by classification

iv.  Whether those wages are at rates less than those prevailing

  • National Labor Relations Act (29 U.S.C. 158(f)):
    • Recipients are to provide certification that the project includes a project labor agreement, a pre-hire collective bargaining agreement that is in accordance with the National Labor Relations Act (29 U.S.C. 158(f)) section 8(f).
  • Applicants must provide information on whether the project prioritizes local hires.
  • Applicants must provide information on whether the project has a Community Benefit Agreement with a description of such agreement.

Civil Rights and Nondiscrimination Law

Recipients of the Broadband Ready Communities Program are required to be in compliance with all civil rights and nondiscrimination federal laws related to the use of federal funds. Recipients shall not discriminate or deny benefits or services, on the basis of race, color, national origin (including limited English proficiency), disability, age, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, or handicap. Recipients are required to agree to, by a form of binding commitment, abide by all civil rights and non-discrimination requirements set forth. The following is a general description of requirements; for an exhaustive list with exact requirements, reference State and Local Fiscal Recovery Funds Guidance lune 2023 (treasury.gov).

  1. Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. § 2000d-1 et seq.) and the Treasury's implementing regulations, 31 C.F.R. part 22, which states that no person in the United States shall, on the basis of race, color, or national origin, excluded from      participation in, denied benefits or services of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance.
  2. Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (20 U.S.C § 1681 et seq.) and the Treasury's implementing regulations, 31 C.F.R. part 28, states that no person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, denied benefits or services of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance.
  3. The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C § 12101 et seq.) states that discrimination on the basis of disability in employment, state and local government, public accommodations, commercial facilities, transportation, and telecommunications is strictly prohibited.
  4. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. § 794) prohibits the discrimination of a qualified individual with a disability under any program or activity that receives federal financial assistance.
  5. The Age Discrimination Act of 1975 (42 U.S.C. § 6101 et seq.), and the Treasury's implementing regulations, 31 C.F.R. part 23, prohibits discrimination based on age for any programs or activities receiving federal financial assistance.
  6. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 42 U.S.C. § 2000e et seq., states that it is an unlawful employment practice for an employer to discriminate against an individual with respect to employment on the basis of the individual's race, color, religion, sex, or national origin.

Domestic Preference

Under Uniform Guidance (2 CFR 200.322), grantees must provide a preference for the purchase, acquisition, or use of goods, products, or materials produced in the United States. This includes items and construction materials composed of metals, plastics, aggregate (such as optical fiber), and lumber. All items made in whole or in part of these covered materials apply. Grantees should make all efforts to document this preference and ensure subcontractor compliance, including listing the referenced clause in all subcontracts.

 

 

Technology Opportunities for the Public (TOP) Grants

Overview

The Training Opportunities for the Public (TOP) Grant is available for public libraries to be able to provide services for their communities. Grant funds are available for the following:

  • Training
  • Hotpots
  • Solar Charging Tables
  • Internal Connections

Please note: All libraries participating in this grant must provide digital literacy training to the public. Applicants that do not request funds for training will be required to document at least 4 public digital literacy classes held during the grant period.


Who Can Apply?

Public Libraries in the State of Tennessee.

 

More Information

Please contact Jennifer Cowan-Henderson. Jennifer.Cowan-Henderson@tn.gov